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75 Maple Street
Summit, NJ 07901
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Massacre in China

circusThe Summit Herald of July 21, 1900 reported that the City Council debated issuing bonds for the amount of $130,000 to expand and improve the sewer system jointly with several neighboring towns. Disturbing reports came out of Peking about the massacre of foreigners by Chinese troops. A lecture at the Summit YMCA on China by educator William Henry Grant was expected to have good attendance. The Book Committee of the Public Library announced the addition of 40 new books. The editors predicted the re-election of President William McKinley. Hot weather kept the soda fountains at local drugstores busy, with ice cream sodas being in high demand.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Night-Blooming Cereus

pontiacThe Summit Herald of July 14, 1931 reported that florist L.E. Stahl had a Night-Blooming Cereus in his Springfield Avenue greenhouse, producing large, beautifully-scented flowers that bloomed at midnight and died the next day. The Fresh Air camps on Mountain Avenue sponsored by a Newark charity reopened for the tenth year running. Camp Eastwood for boys and Camp Sunshine for girls provided outdoor activities and 5 meals a day for malnourished children from the Newark public schools. Summit purchased a motorized garbage truck to replace the horse-drawn wagons that had been in use. In the Lackawanna Baseball League, the Summit Red Sox lost to the Millburn Blues, while the Chatham Howitzers defeated the Springfield Stars. Contractor Carman Formichella was bitten by a German Police dog which was recently purchased by his nephew, and required 17 stitches. Fortunately, there was no sign of rabies.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Fourth of July Parade

spring frockThe Summit Record of July 7, 1916 reported that Common Council discussed replacing the Fire Department’s horse-drawn Hook and Ladder apparatus with a motorized one costing about $6000. The Fourth of July parade down Springfield Avenue featured over 700 marchers, including members of the Boy Scouts, the Sons of the American Revolution, the Italian-American Society, the Colored Brigade, women of the Special Aid Society, the fire departments of Summit and New Providence, and four bands. The parade was led by automobiles containing members of the Grand Army of the Republic (Civil War veterans). Local baker and business owner Emil Fitterer, a naturalized American citizen, received some complaints because he displayed the German flag on his Springfield Avenue building, although it was flying below Old Glory. The Chief of Police requested that he remove the flag while the parade was passing. Mr. Fitterer complied, but Mrs. Fitterer put it back, seeing that other businesses on the street were permitted to display Japanese, Italian, and Irish flags below the American flag.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php