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75 Maple Street
Summit, NJ 07901
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Homes, Sweet Homes

vienna bakeryThe Summit Herald of July 6, 1907 reported that at least 20 new homes were under construction in Summit, ranging from a “neat cottage” on Beechwood Road to a “palatial brick residence” on Hobart Avenue, while Mr. G.F. Vreeland was adding to the stable and carriage house on his property. Miss Irene Williams of Summit was married to Mr. Joseph Baldwin. The bride was the great-grand-daughter of Congressman Peter Wendover, who co-authored the bill decreeing that the number of states in the Union would be represented by the number of stars (not stripes) on the flag.


Young’s Bowling Alleys advertised the opening of a shooting gallery, with prizes offered to the best marksman. In the classified ads, a boy of about 13 was wanted to drive [a horse] and answer the telephone, and someone wished to rent an upright piano for 3 months.


The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

A Murderer in the Woods?

gardensecretsThe Summit Herald of June 29, 1923 reported that a large group of police, firemen, and civilian volunteers searched the woods on the northern edge of the city, after several young boys reported seeing a man with a shotgun. The authorities suspected that this might be the man who had murdered two people in New Providence earlier in the week. No one was found. When questioned, the boys could not describe the man, and were not entirely sure if he was carrying a shotgun or a large stick. Later evidence suggested that the suspect had escaped to Dover.

The Summit Parent-Teacher Associations announced a series of lectures to be given in the fall by Dr. Raymond Ditmars, Curator of Reptiles at the New York Zoological Park. The lectures, in the new high school auditorium would be accompanied by "wonderful moving pictures” of animals, reptiles, insects, and sea creatures.

The Business Men’s Association discussed the problems of litter on the downtown streets, and also of electric signs which violated local ordinances by extending more than 3 feet from buildings. The Mayor’s Committee announced their plans for the Fourth of July celebration, including daytime entertainment for children, evening fireworks, and a performance by the Millburn municipal band (the Summit band had already committed to performing in Chatham).

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Silk Weavers Strike Again

park houseThe Summit Herald of June 22, 1901 reported that the two hundred silk weavers employed at the silk mills of Summit went on strike for increase in their pay rate, which had been 6¢ to 8¢ per yard. The mill owners agreed to an additional of 1¢ to 1-1/2¢ per yard, and recognized the weavers union. The Common Council meeting was crowded with citizens protesting the proposed widening of Woodland Avenue, which would have required cutting down many beautiful trees. The Park House property—three acres and a 100-guest hotel—was sold to Mr. Theodore Beck, a wealthy Hoboken silk manufacturer residing in Summit. The 20-piece Hill City Band announced their first open-air concert of the season. For Sale: a horse, harness, canopy-top surrey complete with whip and carriage robe, for $125.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php