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75 Maple Street
Summit, NJ 07901
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Rev. Florence Randolph Visits Holy Land

tennis laundry

The Summit Herald of September 8, 1931 reported that the Board of Education defended its decision to open schools on schedule—including the new Jefferson School and expanded Franklin School—despite there being a polio outbreak in the metropolitan region, and one active case in Summit. Several other local school districts, among them Millburn, Madison, Westfield, and Berkeley Heights, decided to postpone opening. The Rev. Florence Randolph gave a talk at the Colored Y.M.C.A. Hall about her recent trip to the Holy Land. In the “help wanted” column, a family of 5 was looking for a houseworker, preferably German or Swedish. A highlight of the Atlantic City flower show was an exotic South American orchid called Espiritu Santo, imported by the Summit firm of Lager & Hurrell.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Runaway Horse

housewife terrorThe Summit Record of August 25, 1906 reported that a horse tethered to a signpost in front of the Wolff Building on Maple Street was frightened by a passing express van, and bolted onto the sidewalk, uprooting the signpost. It was caught before it could enter a nearby store. A letter to the editor praised Summit resident Anthony Comstock, founder of the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice, and special agent of the U.S. Postal Service. Comstock had been widely denounced in national newspapers for raiding the Art Students’ League of New York and seizing copies of a catalog that contained samples of members’ work, including several nudes. During a local baseball game, part of the bleachers collapsed.

There were only minor injuries. Foreign news included a revolt against the government of President Palma in Cuba, a deadly earthquake in Chile, and the arrest of 12 Japanese seal poachers in the Aleutian Islands.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

 

New Cases of Infantile Paralysis (polio)

polioThe Summit Record of August 18, 1916 reported that two new cases of infantile paralysis [polio] were discovered in Summit. One of the children was a resident of a six-family tenement on Aubrey Street. The building was placed under a 2-week quarantine, which was enforced by a barbed-wire fence and the presence of a police officer. A scene for a moving picture was filmed at the Summit train station. The Summit area was popular with movie producers because of the natural beauty of the region. Summit letter carrier David Carter returned from Douglas, Arizona, where his unit of the New Jersey National Guard had been stationed in the conflict against Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php