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75 Maple Street
Summit, NJ 07901
908.273.0350

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War Won't Last Long

february coiffuresThe Summit Herald of February 9, 1940 reported that Boy Scout troops created special window displays in local stores to honor the 30th anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America. Former German official Max Brauer spoke at the First Baptist Church, saying that Hitler’s aim was to dominate all of Europe. He advised the audience that America should stay out of the war, which he predicted would be much shorter than the 1914-1918 war, as the German people would surely revolt against Hitler when conditions became intolerable. In January, 177 people found jobs through the Summit office of the New Jersey State Employment Service. The Strand Theater was showing “Balalaika”, starring Nelson Eddy as an aristocratic Russian captain in love with a beautiful singer from a family of revolutionaries, while the Strand Theater presented Laurel and Hardy in “The Flying Deuces”.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

A Concert of Light

knickersThe Summit Herald of February 2, 1923 reported that inventor Thomas Wilfred would be coming to Summit with his clavilux, or ‘color organ’ to perform at the concert of the Summit Choral Society. The editorial page condemned the activities of the Ku Klux Klan in Louisiana and praised the defeat of the Bursum Bill, which would have weakened the land and water rights of the Pueblo Indians in New Mexico. Closer to home, it expressed serious concern about a trade in bootleg liquor among boys in Summit, some as young as 16. Guest lecturer Rev. John Haynes Holmes spoke at All Souls’ Church on conditions in post-war Europe. He recommended cancelling the war debt owed by Germany to France, and commented on changes in Russia under the Bolshevik government.

 In the classified ads, lost items included a silk navy blue umbrella, a gold fountain pen, a tire chain, and a child’s fur neck piece made from Australian opossum. “H.C.M” was selling monkey-fur capes at reasonable prices. The radio section contained broadcast schedules for local stations, as well as 4 circuit diagrams for radio amateurs to design their own crystal sets.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

 

Long Live the King!

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The Summit Herald of January 26, 1901 reported that the Summit Library was being heavily used, thanks to its expanded schedule—open every day except Wednesday and Sunday. The Summit YMCA celebrated its 14th anniversary with a special interdenominational  service at the Methodist Episcopal Church. In London, Edward VII was officially proclaimed king following the death of his mother, Queen Victoria. The British-American Association of Summit announced a memorial service for the late Queen to be held at Calvary Church.  News from Muskogee in Indian Territory indicated that the nearby town of Bristow was in danger of being attacked by an armed band of Creek Indians. Boarding-house owner George Massumian was fined $50 for the illegal sale of alcohol. In the classifieds, a “fine seamstress” wished to exchange six half-days of work for a place to live, and a colored man was looking for a position as a coachman.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php