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Summit, NJ 07901
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An Expensive Crap Game

crystal02The Summit Herald of September 14, 1907 reported that the Lackawanna baseball league ended the last game of the season with Summit winning 4-2 over Chatham. In the classifieds, rewards were offered for a lost small diamond brooch and a lost (or stolen) girl’s bicycle.

Rubenstein Carr, the butler for Mr. Coler interrupted a burglary of his employer’s Summit Avenue home. He was awakened in the middle of the night by a noise, and came downstairs, revolver in hand, to find the electric lights on and a man darting towards the open front door. Carr fired several shots, shattering the glass in the door, but missing the burglar. The police could not find the suspect, who left behind a sheet piled with silver, cut-glass, and other valuables.

Four men were playing craps beneath an electric light on New England Avenue near Fair Oaks Sanitarium when an argument began. Kirkland Schuyler threw a stone at Eliazai Brown, who responded by cutting him with a knife. The wounded Schuyler was found by a patrolman and taken to Overlook Hospital for treatment. The judge ruled that Brown had acted in self-defense. Schuyler pleaded guilty to assault and was fined $25; the other men were fined $5 each.

The new Cunard steamship Lusitania was expected to complete her maiden voyage from England to New York in a record-breaking four days.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

President McKinley shot!

mckinley01The Summit Herald of September 7, 1901 reported that President William McKinley was shot the previous afternoon while visiting the Temple of Music at the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo. Surgeons were able to remove a bullet from the chest, but not the second one, which went into the abdomen. The wounds were serious, but there was hope that the President might recover.

Labor Day was celebrated by a special exhibition of the Summit Fire Department. All four fire companies turned out in full uniform with their equipment, including the new hook and ladder truck, which was pulled by a fine team of bay horses. Each company demonstrated their skills with timed trials: connecting hoses to hydrants and raising ladders to the tops of buildings.

Miss Ethel Hay returned from her vacation at Bradley Beach with a special souvenir: a silver trophy cup. She had the highest score of the season in the Bradley Beach Ladies Bowling Club.

The editorial page quoted the Newark Advertiser on the practice of “tipping” in barber shops and restaurants. The custom was borrowed from Europe, and became universal in the United States, but in the editors’ opinion, it was un-American, and should be abolished.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Swimming the Canal, Bamming the Ivories

dry cleaningThe Summit Herald of August 31, 1928 reported that Summit resident Henry Birdsall Marsh had been chosen as the architect of a half-million-dollar building at Drew University. Summit was the meeting place for members of the NJ State Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs. A recent session of the Debating Club focused on the candidates for the upcoming presidential election: Herbert Hoover and Al Smith. Two young men from Summit returned from a summer cruise of 28,000 miles as cadets on the steamship “American Legion”, journeying to Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina. Items for sale in the classifieds included a 1925 Star touring car ( $75), an Atwater Kent 5-tube radio set, a Thor electric washing machine, and elderberries.

Aviator Arthur Goebel, Jr. flew from Los Angeles to New York in 18 hours 58 minutes. For the first time ever, the locks of the Panama Canal opened for a person, not a ship, as American adventurer Richard Halliburton swam the length of the canal. In Berlin, Edward Kemp set a world record for non-stop piano playing, having “bammed the ivories” for 82 hours.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php